Tag Archives: composter

$50 OFF On Sun-Mar 400 Continuous Composter

Sun-Mar 400: The Sun-Mar 400 has been a reliable leader in large composting units. Made of heavy duty plastic, the Sun-Mar 400 is built to last.

People Powered Machines: For the month of August, People Powered Machines is offering $50 off when you purchase a Sun-Mar 400 Continuous Composter. This is a great way to begin composting.

Things You Can Compost:
From the Kitchen

Coffee grounds and filters, these are excellent
Tea bags
Used paper napkins
Pizza boxes, ripped into smaller pieces
Paper bags, either ripped or balled up
The crumbs you sweep off of the counters and floors
Plain cooked pasta
Plain cooked rice
Stale bread
Paper towel rolls
Stale saltine crackers
Cereal
Used paper plates (as long as they don’t have a waxy coating)
Cellophane bags (be sure it’s really Cellophane and not just clear plastic—there’s a difference.)
Nut shells (except for walnut shells, which can be toxic to plants)
Old herbs and spices
Stale pretzels
Pizza crusts
Cereal boxes (tear them into smaller pieces first)
Wine corks
Moldy cheese
Melted ice cream
Old jelly, jam, or preserves
Stale beer and wine
Paper egg cartons
Toothpicks
Bamboo skewers
Paper cupcake or muffin cups

From the Bathroom

Used facial tissues
Hair from your hairbrush
Toilet paper rolls
Old loofahs
Nail clippings
Urine
100% Cotton cotton balls
Cotton swabs made from 100% cotton and cardboard (not plastic) sticks

Personal Items

It might be a good idea to bury these items in your pile. Just sayin’.

Cardboard tampon applicators
Latex condoms

From the Laundry Room

Dryer lint
Old/stained cotton clothing—rip or cut it into smaller pieces
Old wool clothing—rip or cut it into smaller pieces

From the Office

Bills and other documents you’ve shredded
Envelopes (minus the plastic window)
Pencil shavings
Sticky notes
Business cards (as long as they’re not glossy)
Receipts

Around the House

Contents of your vacuum cleaner bag or canister
Newspapers (shredded or torn into smaller pieces)
Subscription cards from magazines
Leaves trimmed from houseplants
Dead houseplants and their soil
Flowers from floral arrangements
Natural potpourri
Used matches
Ashes from the fireplace, barbecue grill, or outdoor fire pit

Party and Holiday Supplies

Wrapping paper rolls
Paper table cloths
Crepe paper streamers
Latex balloons
Raffia
Excelsior
Jack o’ Lanterns
Those hay bales you used as part of your outdoor fall decor
Natural holiday wreaths
Your Christmas tree. Chop it up with some pruners first (or use a wood chipper, if you have one…)
Evergreen garlands

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Everyday Garden Tool Cart

Vertex Garden Cart:

The Vertex Garden Cart: is a wonderful tool holder, organizer, carrier. My Vertex Garden Cart holds shovels, two rakes, a hoe, a weeder, a broom, ice pick, pitch fork, 3 types of garden and pruning shears, trowels and more.

When Gardening: The Vertex Garden Cart easily rolls to your garden where you have all the tools you need. Everyone has experienced starting to work and then needing one or two more tools. And then having to return to the garage and get that necessary tool. With the Garden Cart, just make sure you have the tools on your cart before leaving your garage, and you are set for your gardening experience of the day.

Extra Space: The Garden Cart has space for small tools in the apron where many tools such as a trowel can be placed. And there is a rack at the bottom where you can add plants or compost to the cart.

Best feature: What I like best about the cart is that the tools stay in the same place year round. No more stacking up against a wall or hanging in their places. My tools stay in the cart year round. I always know where they are.

Clean, Green Fun at City’s Schools



News : Education Mar 18, 2011 – 9:57 AM

Clean, green fun at city schools

By Mayor’s office, city of Stamford

Mayor Michael Pavia is announcing the rollout of the “RolyPig” composter to Springdale Elementary School. The Solid Waste and Recycling Department has purchased six RolyPig composters, which will be used at six schools to compost organic food waste. This program will begin at Springdale School with the help of Mayor Pavia, Recycling Supervisor, Dan Colleluori and Phys Ed Instructor, Jeff Gruetzner, on Thursday, March 24th at 12 noon at the school.

Students and Staff from the school, along with Chartwells Food Services (the company that supplies the cafeteria food) will all be working together to “feed” the pig. The compost generated will go into the school’s gardens.

‘The RolyPig composter is a fun and easy way for our school children to take the kitchen and food waste at school and turn it into compost. It offers an interactive opportunity to participate in yet another level of recycling,” shared Mayor Michael Pavia.

After about 12-15 weeks of feeding and rolling, the RolyPig compost will be ready for the garden. Additional schools slated to receive the RolyPig are Dolan and Cloonan Middle Schools, and the International School at Rogers Magnet.

It is anticipated that continued recycling education will help make Stamford a greener environment, while helping reduce our waste removal costs.

© Copyright by StamfordPlus.com. Some articles and pictures posted on our website, as indicated by their bylines, were submitted as press releases and do not necessarily reflect the position and opinion of StamfordPlus.com, Stamford Plus magazine, Canaiden LLC or any of its associated entities. Articles may have been edited for brevity and grammar.

How to best use Coco Fiber with your composter, compost pails and crocks

Coco Fiber in Collection Pails/Compost Crock: Generally one must take the disc or brick of Coco Fiber and rehydrate and decompress it by placing in a container of water. Once the fiber has expanded its best to dry it out by leaving the fiber out on your porch or deck or at the very least in an open bucket in your kitchen. Coco fiber works best for collection pails when its its completely dried out. The reason for drying is that the coco fiber can then be added each time you add green matter to your composter and it will immediately absorb excess moisture to prevent odor and improper breakdown. If you store coco fiber in expanded dry form you will have the best results. Each time you add green matter to your collection pail or compost crock add a layer of coco fiber to completely cover the newly added green matter.  You will notice less odor and pests in the collection pail. When you are ready to transfer your collection pail to a larger composter the material will already be premixed with green and brown matter.

Hint: If coco fiber discs are used in the compressed form, it can be broken up by hand and added to the pail without having to decompress.  You can even drop the whole disc in and it will eventually absorb the excess moisture and start to expand.  Its simply a  matter off convenience. But a good rule of thumb is to maximize the benefits of the coco fiber by storing it in expanded dry form.

Coco Fiber in Composters: It’s always best to expand the coco fiber and dry it out before use in the composters. But generally it’s ok to expand the coco fiber and add immediately to large composters because they tend to dry out faster (due to the higher temperatures) and the added moisture in coco fiber could be beneficial to the compost mix. A 1:3 ratio of coco fiber to green matter is a good rule of thumb but it really depends on the types of green matter being added. So the user needs to balance the mix based on his needs. Again how you use the coco fiber can depend on need and convenience so some may want to simply add a compressed brick or disc directly to the bin. The decision to decompress and dry out simply depends on whether the user has time or more importantly is whether they need an immediate effect. For example if their compost is starting to smell then dry expanded coco fiber will rapidly solve their odor issue. If the compost is well balanced and without significant odor then they can get away with adding the compressed form directly or even the expanded wet form immediately after expansion.

Coco Fiber in NatureMill: In the NatureMilll an easy way to use the coco fiber is to break up a coco fiber disc and spread a layer over the top after adding green matter. We recently added a coco fiber pellet pack. If you are using the pellets you simply have to add 3 pellets for every 5 cups of green matter. The pellets are small enough so they wont jam the machine and will absorb moisture and expand on their own.

Coco Fiber in Worm Bins: Decompress the coco fiber by soaking in water and then drain off excess water and place directly in the bin as a bedding for the worms.

Composting the Food Waste of 18,000 soldiers!

Army Consultant: On  Monday we spoke with an Army consultant about providing a composting service. The service was for 18,000 soldiers, three meals per day, seven days per week. That is a lot of food waste.

A Rocket Composter

Waste Pulper and Rocket: If used with the Waste Pulper which decreases food waste by 75%, the Rocket can handle this volume of food waste. Our large Rocket can handle 2,775 gallons of food waste per week. After two weeks the Rocket will be making compost each day.

Compost: The Compost needs to be cured for about three weeks after it is produced before being used. This means letting it sit under dry conditions. After three weeks you are in compost!

The Things You Can Compost! Yes, you can!

We found this neat list from Treehugger. This list provides a great start to composting. The list gives you lots of ideas of the many, many items that are just right for your composting efforts. The composting process benefits from materials being broken up into pieces about the size of a golf ball. But if that is a problem, no worries, compost happens. Don’t throw this stuff away, use it for making compost.

From the Kitchen

Coffee grounds and filters
Tea bags
Used paper napkins
Pizza boxes, ripped into smaller pieces
Paper bags, either ripped or balled up
The crumbs you sweep off of the counters and floors
Plain cooked pasta
Plain cooked rice
Stale bread
Paper towel rolls
Stale saltine crackers
Cereal
Used paper plates (as long as they don’t have a waxy coating)
Cellophane bags (be sure it’s really Cellophane and not just clear plastic—there’s a difference.)
Nut shells (except for walnut shells, which can be toxic to plants)
Old herbs and spices
Stale pretzels
Pizza crusts
Cereal boxes (tear them into smaller pieces first)
Wine corks
Moldy cheese
Melted ice cream
Old jelly, jam, or preserves
Stale beer and wine
Paper egg cartons
Toothpicks
Bamboo skewers
Paper cupcake or muffin cups

From the Bathroom

Used facial tissues
Hair from your hairbrush
Toilet paper rolls
Old loofahs
Nail clippings
Urine
100% Cotton cotton balls
Cotton swabs made from 100% cotton and cardboard (not plastic) sticks

Personal Items

It might be a good idea to bury these items in your pile. Just sayin’.

Cardboard tampon applicators
Latex condoms

From the Laundry Room

Dryer lint
Old/stained cotton clothing—rip or cut it into smaller pieces
Old wool clothing—rip or cut it into smaller pieces

From the Office

Bills and other documents you’ve shredded
Envelopes (minus the plastic window)
Pencil shavings
Sticky notes
Business cards (as long as they’re not glossy)
Receipts

Around the House

Contents of your vacuum cleaner bag or canister
Newspapers (shredded or torn into smaller pieces)
Subscription cards from magazines
Leaves trimmed from houseplants
Dead houseplants and their soil
Flowers from floral arrangements
Natural potpourri
Used matches
Ashes from the fireplace, barbecue grill, or outdoor fire pit

Party and Holiday Supplies

Wrapping paper rolls
Paper table cloths
Crepe paper streamers
Latex balloons
Raffia
Excelsior
Jack o’ Lanterns
Those hay bales you used as part of your outdoor fall decor
Natural holiday wreaths
Your Christmas tree. Chop it up with some pruners first (or use a wood chipper, if you have one…)
Evergreen garlands

New and Improved Rolypig!

Fur from the dog or cat brush
Droppings and bedding from your rabbit/gerbil/hamsters, etc.
Newspaper/droppings from the bottom of the bird cage
Feathers
Alfalfa hay or pellets (usually fed to rabbits)
Rawhide dog chews
Fish food
Dry dog or cat food

Food Establishments With Green Ideas, We Have Machines For You

Food Establishments: Great news! We now have machines for your food waste needs. First we have the excellent Rocket composting machine which turns your food waste into usable compost in two weeks. The smallest Rocket machine is for clients who have about 80 gallons of food waste per week. The largest Rocket machine serves a client who produces 925 gallons per week.

Waste Pulper: For those food establishments looking to reduce their food waste by a 10 to 3 ratio, we offer the Waste Pulpler. This would mean if you normally put out 10 bags of food waste, after using the waste pulper, you would only be putting out 3 bags of food waste. The Waste Pulper is also used for those who wish to reduce food waste before putting the food waste into the composting process.

Ecorect: For those Food Establishments who can’t compost but want to reduce food waste the Ecorect reduces food waste by a 10 to 1 ratio. For those presently sending 10 bags of food waste to the waste facility, after using the Ecorect, you would just be sending one bag of food waste. The Ecorect is an excellent machine for single source food waste such as a shrimp processing plant.

The Vegawatt: For those Food Establishments which use 30 or more gallons a week of vegetable oil, the Vegawatt may be for you. You need to be able to store the unit outside on concrete. If you have the outside room, this machine will pay for itself in 3 – 4 years. Running 24/7, it can reduce your electrical bill by 25% and also contributes to your hot water bill. Photo of Vegawatt below.