Tag Archives: COMPOSTING

Rolypigs Popular In Elementary Schools!

The Rolypig: The cute, adorable, efficient Rolypig Composter continues to be popular with Elementary Schools. Often the Rolypig serves to generate curriculum in the schools Science program.

New and Improved Rolypig!

Best Practices: When feeding your food waste to the Rolypig it is best to feed small items – about the size of a golf ball would be perfect. This makes the food waste move smoothly through the Rolypig and the composting process. But when the compost comes out the back end and is not fully matured, no problem, just feed it into the Rolypig for another run.

Timing: It takes about 10 weeks for your Rolypig to produce compost.

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A Smart Cart

The Smart Cart: The Smart Cart is a very versatile and useful people powered machine. It comes in two sizes and many colors and offers four wheel options. The Smart Cart may be used to haul farm supplies, wood, gardening materials, trash, stones, plants and trees. Nearly everyday I use my Smart Cart.

Pans are waterproof and durable.

Smart Cart hauls up to 600 pound EASILY. Frontwards or backwards. Perfectly balanced design.

Two Sizes and multiple wheels: The Smart Cart comes in two sizes, a 7’cubic and a 12’cubic tubs. You can move your cart with flat-free tires or regular tires. Tires come in 20″ spoke or 16″ turf tires.

Smart Cart Warranty: The Smart Cart comes with a five year warranty. Smart Carts are used by Disney World among many others.

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The InSinkErator: The InSinkErator waste pulper can reduce your food waste by up to 80%. The InSinkErator reduces all food waste including paper products. InSinkErator Waste Xpress® pulper systems can efficiently process food wastes without special materials. Liquid and solid … Continue reading

Vegware a Sponsor at Fire and Flannel

Vegware recently was a sponsor at the Fire and Flannel event held in South Hamilton. Showing off their 80 completely compostable cutlery, tableware, and takeout packaging items during the event. The event was sold out even on a very chilly evening.

Three bands kept the music flowing over the course of the three our food and drink affair. In addition to Vegware, the other sponsors included Taza Chocolate, The Food Project, Maitland Mountain Farm, Chankge is Simple, Valley View Farm, Verterra, Ipswich Ale, Apple Street Farm, First Light Farm, NECR, The Gravel Project, QWIll, Privateer, and the Organic Sound Project.

The Rocket Composter

Composter for Schools,Universities, and Hospitals: The Rocket composter is perfect for schools and universities or for any establishment which has lots of food waste. The Rocket comes in four sizes. The smallest Rocket, the A500 can process 80 gallons of food waste each week. The largest Rocket, the 1200 processes 925 gallons of food waste per week. When a Waste Pulper is used, the A500 can process 240 gallons per week and the 1200 can process 2,775 gallons per week.

Two Weeks for Compost: After running for two weeks the Rocket begins producing compost. And this is high quality compost which can be used around campus or sold.

Other facilities: Other users of the Rocket Composter would be Government Facilities, Prisons, Hotels, Hospitals, Corporate Cafeterias and Nursing Homes. Call 978 884 8156 to learn more about Rocket Composters, Waste Pulpers, and Vegawatt Cogeneration Systems

$50 OFF On Sun-Mar 400 Continuous Composter

Sun-Mar 400: The Sun-Mar 400 has been a reliable leader in large composting units. Made of heavy duty plastic, the Sun-Mar 400 is built to last.

People Powered Machines: For the month of August, People Powered Machines is offering $50 off when you purchase a Sun-Mar 400 Continuous Composter. This is a great way to begin composting.

Things You Can Compost:
From the Kitchen

Coffee grounds and filters, these are excellent
Tea bags
Used paper napkins
Pizza boxes, ripped into smaller pieces
Paper bags, either ripped or balled up
The crumbs you sweep off of the counters and floors
Plain cooked pasta
Plain cooked rice
Stale bread
Paper towel rolls
Stale saltine crackers
Cereal
Used paper plates (as long as they don’t have a waxy coating)
Cellophane bags (be sure it’s really Cellophane and not just clear plastic—there’s a difference.)
Nut shells (except for walnut shells, which can be toxic to plants)
Old herbs and spices
Stale pretzels
Pizza crusts
Cereal boxes (tear them into smaller pieces first)
Wine corks
Moldy cheese
Melted ice cream
Old jelly, jam, or preserves
Stale beer and wine
Paper egg cartons
Toothpicks
Bamboo skewers
Paper cupcake or muffin cups

From the Bathroom

Used facial tissues
Hair from your hairbrush
Toilet paper rolls
Old loofahs
Nail clippings
Urine
100% Cotton cotton balls
Cotton swabs made from 100% cotton and cardboard (not plastic) sticks

Personal Items

It might be a good idea to bury these items in your pile. Just sayin’.

Cardboard tampon applicators
Latex condoms

From the Laundry Room

Dryer lint
Old/stained cotton clothing—rip or cut it into smaller pieces
Old wool clothing—rip or cut it into smaller pieces

From the Office

Bills and other documents you’ve shredded
Envelopes (minus the plastic window)
Pencil shavings
Sticky notes
Business cards (as long as they’re not glossy)
Receipts

Around the House

Contents of your vacuum cleaner bag or canister
Newspapers (shredded or torn into smaller pieces)
Subscription cards from magazines
Leaves trimmed from houseplants
Dead houseplants and their soil
Flowers from floral arrangements
Natural potpourri
Used matches
Ashes from the fireplace, barbecue grill, or outdoor fire pit

Party and Holiday Supplies

Wrapping paper rolls
Paper table cloths
Crepe paper streamers
Latex balloons
Raffia
Excelsior
Jack o’ Lanterns
Those hay bales you used as part of your outdoor fall decor
Natural holiday wreaths
Your Christmas tree. Chop it up with some pruners first (or use a wood chipper, if you have one…)
Evergreen garlands

Silent Cut Reel Mower Does a Great Job!

First Spin: I just took my Silent Cut 21″ reel mower out for its first job of mowing my 1/2 acre lawn. Wow, what a beautiful job the Silent Cut push reel mower did. Because its blades are 21″ wide it took quite a bit less time to do.

The Silent Cut Mower

Blade Adjustment: The blade adjustment is done using the elongated brass adjustment nut. You need to adjust the nut on both sides of the mower. Make sure to just adjust the brass piece with a wrench.

Easy to Push: With the weight of the mower I expected it to be difficult to push. But I was happily surprised that once you got the Silent Cut 21″ started it was fairly easy to push. This was the mower which I was recommending for mowing Bermuda and Zoysia grass. Now I’ll recommend it for all grasses.